Fishing lizards (aka salamanders):

We believe Rude Baits lizards are some of the best lizards on the market. They are available in one size, 6” as we believe that is the only size needed to catch bass of any size. They come in our standard set of eight colors; Watermelon Seed, Green Pumpkin Seed, Grape Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Kiwi Seed, Pomegranate Seed, Junebug and Black with blue flake. We anticipate offering lizard laminates in the future. We have had great success with black and red as well as other color combinations we are currently testing. Although plastic lizards are almost always referred to as lizards, in reality, the bait is more often imitating a salamander which is an amphibious creature found in various parts of the United States and other areas worldwide depending on the specie. Small lizards inhabit land areas only, although if a lizard finds itself in the water, a bass will certainly eat it.
Lizards can be fished a variety of methods but certainly the three most common methods are Texas rigged, Carolina rigged and fished weedless. Rude Baits lizards have our proprietary formula that includes salt and scent and are designed for a slow descent when fished without weight. Sometimes you’ll want a very small amount of weight either to add casting distance or for a particular technique such as getting the nose down faster than the body. You can add a small split shot right up against your hook to get a fast nose first descent, or add the split shot up your line to get a different look on the descent and add casting distance. I always insert the hook Texas style to make the lizard weedless. This allows to you to fish the bait in heavy cover, weeds, submerged trees, rock areas, etc. without getting it snagged.
Without a doubt, the best time to fish lizards is during the spawn when males are protecting bed areas and the bigger females are on the beds. The lizard is my “go to” bait during this period of time. Before we discuss techniques, we are aware not every bass fisherman believes in targeting the big females during the spawn and we at Rude Baits would like to encourage anyone targeting spawning bass to make sure to handle them as carefully as possible to minimize any stress on the fish during this critical period. This means bringing the fish in as quickly as possible and carefully releasing the fish with minimal handling.
Techniques:
Sight fishing: If fishing beds during the spawn period, try rigging the lizard weedless without any weight. Cast so the lizard will fall directly on the bed area and if you are not bit on the sink, let the lizard sit there. You’ll normally see the smaller males surround the lizard and one will normally approach the bait and quickly inhale and expel the lizard. You’ll need to be extremely fast on your hook set to get these fish. Bigger females may also do this but they frequently will simply inhale the bait and give you time for a hook set. If the bass are simply looking at the lizard and not inhaling it, give the slightest twitch to your rod tip so the lizard moves but moves as little as possible. This action will frequently elicit the strike. If you’ve moved the lizard off the bed, cast again and repeat this process of letting the lizard sit for at least 15 to 30 seconds before any movement of the bait. Sometimes you’ll have to make numerous casts before getting the fish to hit the bait. However, once the bass realizes the lizard is going to keep coming back to the bed (due to your repeated casts), they will eventually strike the lizard either to move it by inhaling and expelling it quickly, or just outright nailing the bait to kill it.
Using the split shot at the nose of the lizard is sometimes very effective as it gives the bait the appearance that the lizard/salamander is after the eggs.
Another extremely effective method of fishing lizards is fishing them where there are grass mats, tule “laydowns”, lily pads or any type of matted area that allows you to cast the lizard on the matted area and drag it over the matted areas and then let it drop into open water pockets. When fishing this method, try fishing the lizard without any weight and if you do need to add weight, I suggest a very small split shot up against the nose of the lizard.
In the western United States, there aren’t that many lakes that have grass mats and most bass fishing is in deep water lakes where Texas rigged or Carolina rigged baits can be used effectively. Techniques are the same as fishing any Texas rigged or Carolina rigged plastic worm and I’ve had great success in fishing a Texas rigged Rude baits lizard.
As noted in my blog post on fishing soft plastic baits, it is critical to fish soft plastic baits as slow as possible. The number one mistake fisherman make in fishing soft plastics is fishing them too fast.
Check Rude Baits lizards out at https://www.rudebaits.com/products/6-lizard-baits/
Thanks and good fishing! (Please practice catch and release.)

May 19, 2014   Comments Off on Fishing lizards (aka salamanders):

Fishing swim baits for stripers and largemouth bass:

By Mike Rude, October 1, 2013

As I’ve mentioned in prior articles, swim baits can be very effective for largemouth bass and stripers. There are a ton of different swim baits on the market with a wide range in size, design and weight. A lot of fishermen focus on throwing the larger, heavier trout imitations when fishing for stripers. These baits can result in catching the bigger stripers and the occasional double digit largemouth. However, this type of fishing requires heavier rods designed to throw these huge baits and a commitment to put in a lot of work throwing all day long in the hope of getting a big fish. Quite frankly, I prefer to use the smaller baits and catch numbers as you still have a shot at getting a large fish when fishing the smaller baits.

Now is the time of year for stripers. Generally the stripers bite best during the winter months. It is also the time of year when the lakes that have a trout stocking program start stocking trout and this of course turns on the stripers, particularly the big stripers.

Techniques:

Busting shad: If the stripers and largemouth bass are chasing shad schools, this is a great time to throw swim baits into the boils. When doing this, I like to let the swim bait sink a ways and then start a fast retrieve. Whether using a single swim bait, or using a Alabama/Cali rig, I like to throw the 3” Rude Baits swim baits in the Smoke Dawg color. This color is closest to the natural shad color and is very effective. (Note: if you are throwing an Alabama rig, remember that you can only have 3 hooks/jigs on it).   You may also want to try using different color swim baits to see which color the fish prefer that particular day. I’m a firm believer that fish prefer different colors according to the conditions. I typically use darker colors in the morning, (Purple Passion is always a good choice in the morning hours and lighter or more natural colors in sunny conditions in the middle of the day; Smoke Dawg; Salty Sardine, Coastal Classic.)

Another extremely effective method is targeting the stripers chasing the trout. When doing this, use the 5” Rude Baits swim baits in the Purple Passion, Cherry Bomb, Coastal Classic and Smoke Dawg colors. Cast to the areas where the stripers are chasing the trout and use a medium to fast retrieve and vary the action by throwing in an occasional jerk to the retrieve.

Western Outdoor News had a great article on using flies for stripers at Diamond Valley Lake and went into detail on the technique. This requires not only finding the shad schools on your fish finder, but trolling the flies on lead core line and imparting a constant jerk technique to the flies in order to elicit the strike. If you’re not familiar with this technique or don’t have the proper line, flies, etc, try trolling Rude Baits swim baits through the same areas and use a shad style jig head in a sufficient weight to get down to the fish zone according to a normal trolling speed, (1.5 to 3 mph). Try trolling at that speed and if you find the shad schools, as soon as you estimate your swim bait is just outside the shad school, gun the motor to rip the baits through the school. That will often elicit the strike.

Another great technique is first finding the shad schools and then simply casting the swim baits to that area and letting the swim bait fall all of the way to the bottom of the lake, or through the shad school before you start your retrieve. Try using a Cotee jig head for this technique. I recommend again the 3” Smoke Dawg for this technique but you may want to try all of the colors we offer.

Rude Baits swim baits are sold at the Diamond Valley Lake marina store so make sure you pick some up when you’re there.

Check out Rude Baits swim baits at https://www.rudebaits.com/products/swim-baits/

Thanks and good fishing! (Please practice catch and release.)

October 1, 2013   Comments Off on Fishing swim baits for stripers and largemouth bass:

Swim Baits for Yellowtail and Dorado

By Mike Rude, October 1, 2013

If you haven’t gotten in on the great Bluefin, Yellowfin, Dorado and Yellowtail bite yet, now is the time to go! As I mentioned in last month’s newsletter, there’s tons of yellowtail and Dorado out there ranging in size from 5 to 20+ lbs. on the kelps. We’ve been fortunate enough to take a few trips and fishing has been great each time.  Yellowtail and Dorado love the swim baits. What’s really nice about throwing swim baits is, as the boat is slowly coming up on the kelp, you can be the first fisherman to throw your bait out as you’re going to be at the bow ready to throw. Make sure to take into account where the boat is going to slide to after your cast. In other words, make sure you cast to the “far” bow side of the kelp so when your swim bait is sinking, your line isn’t in the way of the bait fishermen. If you like to use spinning tackle, that works great in this situation. For those of you who use conventional tackle, you don’t need a long cast for this technique as the captain normally slides very close to the kelp, easily within casting distance even with a lighter jig head/swim bait. In addition, you don’t need to make much of a cast at all. Simply flip the swim bait out and let it sink. You will frequently get bit on the sink. Let your swim bait sink quite a distance as you want a long retrieve to allow the fish to see the bait and attack it on the retrieve. A fast retrieve can be very effective, even when being retrieved at a somewhat vertical angle. A common mistake in fishing swim baits is not letting them sink enough before the retrieve.

You can use your standard jig sticks or tuna gear that you would use for bait fishing since long casts are not critical in this type of fishing. It certainly doesn’t hurt if you have tackle appropriate for making long casts while throwing swim baits on ¾ to 1.5 oz jig heads. The fish have been biting the heavier line and I would recommend you use at least 30 lb test when using monofilament. If you’re going to use braid/spectra, use the white or yellow as it’s much easier to see. If you have braid on and aren’t getting bit, use a short mono leader (approx 18”) with your braid.

Whether casting swim baits or fishing on the slide, I prefer to use the 5” size of the following Rude Baits swim bait colors, listed in order of preference for yellowtail and Dorado: Kelp Krusher, Purple Passion Mean Sardine, Salty Sardine, Smoke Dawg, Cherry Bomb, Coastal Classic and Aztec.    https://www.rudebaits.com/products/swim-baits/

October 1, 2013   Comments Off on Swim Baits for Yellowtail and Dorado

Fishing lizards (aka salamanders):

By Mike Rude, August 30, 2013
We believe Rude Baits lizards are some of the best lizards on the market. They are available in one size, 6” as we believe that is the only size needed to catch bass of any size. They come in our standard set of eight colors; Watermelon Seed, Green Pumpkin Seed, Grape Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Kiwi Seed, Pomegranate Seed, Junebug and Black with blue flake. We anticipate offering lizard laminates in the future. We have had great success with black and red as well as other color combinations we are currently testing. Although plastic lizards are almost always referred to as lizards, in reality, the bait is more often imitating a salamander which is an amphibious creature found in various parts of the United States and other areas worldwide depending on the specie. Small lizards inhabit land areas only, although if a lizard finds itself in the water, a bass will certainly eat it.
Lizards can be fished a variety of methods but certainly the three most common methods are Texas rigged, Carolina rigged and fished weedless. Rude Baits lizards have our proprietary formula that includes salt and scent and are designed for a slow descent when fished without weight. Sometimes you’ll want a very small amount of weight either to add casting distance or for a particular technique such as getting the nose down faster than the body. You can add a small split shot right up against your hook to get a fast nose first descent, or add the split shot up your line to get a different look on the descent and add casting distance. I always insert the hook Texas style to make the lizard weedless. This allows to you to fish the bait in heavy cover, weeds, submerged trees, rock areas, etc. without getting it snagged.
Without a doubt, the best time to fish lizards is during the spawn when males are protecting bed areas and the bigger females are on the beds. The lizard is my “go to” bait during this period of time. Before we discuss techniques, we are aware not every bass fisherman believes in targeting the big females during the spawn and we at Rude Baits would like to encourage anyone targeting spawning bass to make sure to handle them as carefully as possible to minimize any stress on the fish during this critical period. This means bringing the fish in as quickly as possible and carefully releasing the fish with minimal handling.
Techniques:
Sight fishing: If fishing beds during the spawn period, try rigging the lizard weedless without any weight. Cast so the lizard will fall directly on the bed area and if you are not bit on the sink, let the lizard sit there. You’ll normally see the smaller males surround the lizard and one will normally approach the bait and quickly inhale and expel the lizard. You’ll need to be extremely fast on your hook set to get these fish. Bigger females may also do this but they frequently will simply inhale the bait and give you time for a hook set. If the bass are simply looking at the lizard and not inhaling it, give the slightest twitch to your rod tip so the lizard moves but moves as little as possible. This action will frequently elicit the strike. If you’ve moved the lizard off the bed, cast again and repeat this process of letting the lizard sit for at least 15 to 30 seconds before any movement of the bait. Sometimes you’ll have to make numerous casts before getting the fish to hit the bait. However, once the bass realizes the lizard is going to keep coming back to the bed (due to your repeated casts), they will eventually strike the lizard either to move it by inhaling and expelling it quickly, or just outright nailing the bait to kill it.
Using the split shot at the nose of the lizard is sometimes very effective as it gives the bait the appearance that the lizard/salamander is after the eggs.
Another extremely effective method of fishing lizards is fishing them where there are grass mats, tule “laydowns”, lily pads or any type of matted area that allows you to cast the lizard on the matted area and drag it over the matted areas and then let it drop into open water pockets. When fishing this method, try fishing the lizard without any weight and if you do need to add weight, I suggest a very small split shot up against the nose of the lizard.
In the western United States, there aren’t that many lakes that have grass mats and most bass fishing is in deep water lakes where Texas rigged or Carolina rigged baits can be used effectively. Techniques are the same as fishing any Texas rigged or Carolina rigged plastic worm and I’ve had great success in fishing a Texas rigged Rude baits lizard.
As noted in my blog post on fishing soft plastic baits, it is critical to fish soft plastic baits as slow as possible. The number one mistake fisherman make in fishing soft plastics is fishing them too fast.
Check Rude Baits lizards out at https://www.rudebaits.com/products/6-lizard-baits/
Thanks and good fishing! (Please practice catch and release.)

September 6, 2013   Comments Off on Fishing lizards (aka salamanders):

Fishing for Tuna “on the slide”

By Mike Rude, September 5, 2013
If you haven’t gotten in on the bluefin tuna bite yet, now is the time to go before they’re gone. There’s also tons of yellowtail out there as well as dorado on the kelps so now’s the time to go. We got into a great bite on the bluefin a couple of weeks ago and I didn’t get a chance to use the swim baits “on the slide” as we stopped on meter marks. I did manage one on a jig. However, if you’re not familiar with using swim baits “on the slide”, this article will help you master this relatively simple technique. This technique is used in conjunction with trolling for tuna and implemented when a tuna is hooked up on one or more of the trolling rods.
Use your standard tuna gear that you would use for bait fishing. (This style of fishing is not suited for spinning gear. Use conventional tackle only). For bait fishing, most fishermen are now using 65 to 80 lb braid/spectra with a short fluorocarbon leader of 25 to 50 b test depending on the size of fish being targeted. When fishing swim baits on the slide, you’ll want at least 30 lb test leader and 40 lb is O.K. I suggest using monofilament instead of fluoro since mono has a bit of stretch to it and fluoro doesn’t have any stretch. If you have a tuna rod and reel spooled with 30 or 40 lb mono already, use that as braid is not needed but you’ll need to watch out for getting cut off if your line crosses another angler hooked up using braid. If you’re going to buy braid/spectra, I prefer PowerPro. Use the white or yellow as it’s much easier to see if you do get tangled with other anglers.
Slide Technique: Attach a Rude Baits 5” swim bait to a ½ oz to 1 oz shad style jig head and tie directly to your 30 to 40 mono leader. The leader does not need to be long, I recommend 6 ft of mono tied to the braid with a uni to uni or Albright knot connection.
Stand at the rail, preferably on the stern or at the one of the corners on the stern ready to drop your swim bait into the water when a fish is hooked on one of the trolling rods. As soon as you hear “hookup” or see one of the trolling rods bend form a hookup, drop your swim bait into the water in free spool to allow the swim bait to fall back as the boat comes to a sliding stop, hence the term, “fishing on the slide”. You’ll typically get bit before the boat comes to a stop. Since your reel is in free spool initially, you need to keep your thumb on the spool to prevent backlash when the tuna or yellowtail hits your swim bait. Simply flip into gear and “fish on”! You need to estimate the distance your swim bait is relative to the fish that has been hooked on the troll rod as the boat is sliding forward with the fish on while your swim bait has been dropped back. If you estimate your swim bait is at the point/distance where the troll fish is and you haven’t been bit, put your reel in gear and that will start the swimming action of the swim bait. If you don’t get bit by the time the boat comes to a stop, reel in your swim bait. You’ll frequently get bit as you’re retrieving the swim bait. Don’t let the swim bait “fall behind” the troll rod fish as that is out of the fish zone.
Casting for tuna, yellowtail and dorado: If the boat is targeting floating kelp as a means to finding fish, have a rod rigged with a Rude Baits swim bait instead of the typical iron jig. For this type of fishing, a quality saltwater spinning rod and reel can be used but it is still preferred that quality conventional casting tackle be used. For style of jig head, I like Kalin’s Ultimate Saltwater bullet jig heads 1 to 1.5 oz size. Whether casting swim baits or fishing on the slide, I prefer to use the 5” size of the following Rude Baits swim bait colors, listed in order of preference: Purple Passion; Mean Sardine, Salty Sardine; Smoke Dawg; Coastal Classic; Cherry Bomb; Kelp Krusher, and Aztec. https://www.rudebaits.com/products/swim-baits/

September 6, 2013   Comments Off on Fishing for Tuna “on the slide”

Swim Bait Techniques for Sand Bass

June through September is prime time for sand bass fishing here in southern California and there’s no better way to catch large numbers of sand bass than throwing swim baits. In addition, you’ll normally catch the larger fish throwing swim baits versus fishing live or cut bait. Ask any of the consistent winners of the saltwater bass series tournaments what they fish when they are targeting large sand bass (and Calicos) and they’ll all say swim baits. The 5” size if the most common size fished by the pros for the large sand bass. Colors play a critical role as well but more on that later.
The sand bass spawn is generally sometime in July and there was some great sand bass fishing last month where limits were the rule on the open party boats fishing the TJ and Huntington flats. Private boaters had all the sand bass they wanted during this time as well. In southern California and San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and farther north, the sand bass fishery generally extends from June through September with occasional catches throughout the entire year.
Swim baits and jig heads: When it comes to what jig head to use, it is really up to the angler to use whatever brand jig heads they prefer. In most instances, sand bass are found in open water areas on flats and in the bays, in channels and on humps or changes in the bottom so you don’t need jig heads with a weed guard. As far as size and weight, you want to use a jig head that allows for maximum cast ability according to the rod, reel and line you’re using. As a general rule, jig heads in the 1/2 oz. to 1 oz. range will be needed for the 4” and 5” Rude Baits swim baits.
Rods and reels: Use your Calico rods and reels to target the sand bass.
Line: Always use quality line of the recommended test suited for the reel you’re using. If you’re fishing primarily open water, use good quality monofilament line 10 to 20 lb test. I personally prefer to use 12 lb test when fishing the bays and 15 lb test when fishing the flats only from the standpoint of potentially hooking a larger fish on the flats.
Techniques for throwing swim baits for sand bass: When it comes to fishing for sand bass, there are two tried and true methods for fishing swim baits. Unlike Calico bass that inhabit the entire water column, sand bass stay close to the bottom. The most common technique for targeting sand bass in the bays is to know the structure or area that is holding fish. This may be a channel area, a hump, etc. You need to account for the drift of the boat so make sure you have that figured out first. Position your boat well ahead of the area holding fish and drop your swim bait to the bottom letting line out as your boat drifts toward the spot holding fish. Watch your sonar as you drift over the area holding fish and when you have drifted past it, deploy your sea anchor to stall your boat drift. At this point, you should have let out most of your line on your reel, thereby maximizing the length of your retrieve. Now retrieve your swim bait by retrieving it at the proper speed to keep your swim bait swimming just off the bottom. The sand bass should be facing into the current looking for bait and your swim bait should be swimming toward them. Most likely, you’ll get a hookup! When fishing the flats in a private boat, the technique is basically the same but you can also simply anchor and target a greater area. If fishing on an open party boat, simply make as long a cast as possible, let the swim bait sink all of the way to the bottom and start your retrieve to keep the bait near the bottom. After retrieving a few feet, let the bait drop to the bottom again to maximize the time and length of retrieve at or near the bottom.
Swim bait size and color: Talk to the saltwater bass pros and they’ll all recommend fishing the 5” baits. I like to use both 4” and 5”. You’ll most likely catch bigger fish when using the 5” swim baits. When it comes to color, you definitely want to use a brown (Kelp Krusher) and green (Mean Sardine and Salty Sardine). We’ve also had great success using the Purple Passion and the new Cherry Bomb. As I say with any soft plastic bait, fish the color you have confidence in.
When it comes to swim baits, there are many manufacturers to choose from. We at Rude Baits of course believe our swim baits are the best. All of our baits are injected laminates so you’ll never have the bait split at the color transition point because both colors are injected together. Most other swim bait manufacturers use open pour techniques that allow cooling of one color before the second color is poured on top. This doesn’t always allow the two colors to fuse solidly together, thereby sometimes having the bait split, particularly when you insert the jig head hook into the bait. You’ll never have that problem with Rude Baits! Rude Baits swim baits also have extremely vivid colors and are made with a softer plastic than any other swim bait manufacturer. Rude Baits swim baits are designed to be fished slower than other swim baits. This allows the bait to remain in the fish “zone” longer, thereby increasing the number of strikes! Order some today online at www.rudebaits.com and you’ll see the incredible action they have retrieved at slower speeds.

August 9, 2013   Comments Off on Swim Bait Techniques for Sand Bass

Swim Bait Techniques for Spotted Bay Bass

June through August is prime time for spotted bay bass fishing here in southern California and there’s no better way to catch large numbers of spotted bay bass than throwing swim baits. In addition, you’ll normally catch the larger fish throwing swim baits versus fishing live or cut bait.
What’s nice about the spotted bay bass fishery in San Diego Bay, Mission Bay and farther north is the fishery is pretty much year round and some of the best fishing can be in the “winter” months when sand bass and Calicos are hard to find. January and February are months where Calicos are tough to find but these can be great months to fish the “spotties”, particularly in the evenings and at night.
Another great aspect of fishing spotted bay bass is being able to fish them from shore, and fish for them at night.
Swim baits and jig heads: When it comes to what jig head to use, it is really up to the angler to use whatever brand jig heads they prefer. We suggest using jig heads with a weed guard when targeting the eel grass areas. You’ll also find spotted bay bass along docks and rock structure in any of the Southern California bays and harbors. As far as size and weight, you want to use a jig head that allows for maximum cast ability according to the rod, reel and line you’re using. As a general rule, jig heads in the 1/4 oz. to 3/8 oz. range will be needed for the 3” and 4” Rude Baits swim baits when targeting spotted bay bass as they inhabit shallow water areas. No sense in fishing the 5” baits when targeting spotted bay bass. They definitely prefer the smaller size swim baits. I personally like to fish the 3” baits when solely targeting spotted bay bass. Try different sizes until you find the best size for your particular rod and reel, and fishing situation.
When fishing the 3” and 4” swim baits, make sure you’re using a jig head with a short hook shank length. You don’t want the hook to interfere with the swim bait action. When fishing for sand bass or Calicos, I don’t necessarily think painted or jig head eyes make much of a difference but when targeting spotted bay bass in the day light hours, I do believe matching the jig head to as close as your swim bait helps, including using painted jig heads with eyes.
Rods and reels: Break out your freshwater bass tackle as that is what you need to use for targeting spotted bay bass. Most of the bass you’ll catch will be in the 1 to 3 lb range so there is no need to go heavy.
Line: Always use quality line of the recommended test suited for the reel you’re using. If you’re fishing primarily open water around boat docks and pilings, use good quality monofilament line 10 to 20 lb test. For fishing the eel grass and rock structure areas, I use Power Pro Spectra 30 lb or 50 lb test with a short 20 lb Seaguar fluorocarbon leader of 18” to 24”. I usually join the two lines with a uni to uni knot connection. The Spectra will cut through the eel grass if you get hung up or have a big fish on. A lot of anglers are now using straight Spectra and if you’re fishing at night, no need for a fluorocarbon leader, just use the straight Spectra.
Techniques for throwing swim baits for spotted bay bass: When it comes to fishing for spotted bay bass, you need to fish where there’s eel grass, rocky structure, boat docks, pilings and bridge supports. These are the areas you’ll find spotted bay bass. Whether fishing from a boat, or from shore, cast your swim bait between boat docks, near pilings or bridge supports and let it sink all the way to the bottom. If not bit on the sink, then lift your rod tip to get the swim bait off the bottom and start your retrieve. If you’re using Rude Baits swim baits, a slow to medium, steady retrieve is best. When fishing eel grass areas from shore, cast to the far side of the eel into open water and retrieve the swim bait to the edge of the eel grass at which point you need to get the swim bait to or near the surface and retrieve the baits fast enough to swim the bait over the top of the eel grass. Also target the outside edges of the eel grass by casting parallel to the eel grass. Fishing from a boat gives you a huge advantage not only in getting to far more areas, but being able to target those areas from different angles. The technique is basically the same.
Swim bait size and color: I’m a firm believer that bigger baits catch bigger fish when targeting sand bass and Calicos. However, when targeting spotted bay bass, I’m a firm believer that using smaller swim baits is best. I recommend the 3” and 4” Rude Baits swim baits when fishing spotted bay bass. When it comes to color, we’ve had tremendous success on all of the colors we offer. As I say with any soft plastic bait, fish the color you have confidence in. My favorites for day fishing the spotted bay bass are the Salty Sardine, Mean Sardine, Kelp Krusher and Purple Passion. For night fishing, I like to fish the Aztec, Smoke Dawg and Cherry Bomb.
When it comes to swim baits, there are many manufacturers to choose from. We at Rude Baits of course believe our swim baits are the best. All of our baits are injected laminates so you’ll never have the bait split at the color transition point because both colors are injected together. Most other swim bait manufacturers use open pour techniques that allow cooling of one color before the second color is poured on top. This doesn’t always allow the two colors to fuse solidly together, thereby sometimes having the bait split, particularly when you insert the jig head hook into the bait. You’ll never have that problem with Rude Baits! Rude Baits swim baits also have extremely vivid colors and are made with a softer plastic than any other swim bait manufacturer. Rude Baits swim baits are designed to be fished slower than other swim baits. This allows the bait to remain in the fish “zone” longer, thereby increasing the number of strikes! Order some today online at www.rudebaits.com and you’ll see the incredible action they have retrieved at slower speeds.

August 9, 2013   Comments Off on Swim Bait Techniques for Spotted Bay Bass

Stick Bait Techniques and Tackle

Anyone who has fished for largemouth bass has heard of the Senko™, the largest selling stick bait. Most fishermen are aware that the term “Senko” refers to the trademarked stick bait manufactured by Gary Yamamoto. There are many manufacturers of soft plastic stick baits and this article is not about all of the different manufacturers, or the analysis and review of the different stick or “stik” baits available. Each manufacturer has designed their stick baits according to what they feel is best. You’ll find differences in lengths, diameter, end to end taper and obviously colors and formulas, including salt content. Almost all stick baits contain salt. Any that don’t contain salt, or only have salt added to the exterior of the bait, are pretty much worthless. Rude Baits stick/”Stik” baits contain our proprietary formula that includes a heavy salt content, scent infused into the bait and our soft plastic formula, making them one of the best stick baits manufactured right here in the United States. We make them in eight fishing catching colors; Watermelon Seed, Green Pumpkin Seed, Grape Seed, Pumpkin Seed, Kiwi Seed, Pomegranate Seed, Junebug and Black with blue flake.
Check them out at https://www.rudebaits.com/products/stik-baits/
You can find stick baits in lengths from 1” on up from other manufacturers but we believe the best length by far is the most common length of 5.25”. We believe the 5.25” size is the most effective length to target both largemouth and smallmouth bass of all sizes. Try our stick baits and you’ll see the difference in your catch rate!
Stick/Stik bait tackle: Stick or “Stik” baits can be fished on either spinning or conventional tackle. I like a medium to medium heavy power rod to allow for a solid hook set but I also want a fast action tip to allow for easier casting. Match with an appropriate reel. As always, buy the best quality rod and reel you can afford.
Techniques: Stick baits are most often fished one of two methods; Texas rigged weightless or wacky rigged. However, they can also be effectively fished with the standard Texas rig that includes the sliding bullet weight or Carolina rigged. One of the reasons the standard Texas rigged or Carolina rigged is not used very often is both techniques defeat one of the main attributes of the stick bait and that is the wiggle the bait produces as it falls through the water column. A quality stick bait, whether Texas rigged weedless without any kind of added weight or rigged wacky style with the hook inserted through the middle of the bait hook exposed, will fall through the water column horizontally. This produces a definitive wiggle action of both ends of the bait. This wiggle action is what frequently entices a bite. Rigging Texas rigged with the bullet weight or Carolina rigged causes the bait to fall vertically, thereby negating the wiggle action. However, I’ve caught plenty of bass adding weight to the stick bait via Texas rigging in particular, and adding weight can serve alternative purposes like adding extra casting distance (although stick baits are well known for how far one can cast them) or getting the bait down faster, or holding the bait to the bottom in high wind conditions. One of the main mistakes fishermen make in fishing stick baits is fishing them too fast. The typical technique is to cast the bait to the area holding fish and watch your line as the bait sinks. Any sudden movement, e.g. line suddenly takes off or changes direction indicates a bass has picked up the bait on the drop. Tighten up your line and set the hook immediately. If you’re not bit on the drop, let the bait sit for a minimum of 30 seconds. If you’re tournament fishing and every second counts, thirty seconds seems like an eternity. However, I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve been bit using stick baits where the bass has picked up the bait while it was sitting on the bottom. I firmly believe the bass saw the bait on the drop, moved in to check it out and then inhaled it as it was sitting on the bottom. If you don’t get bit that first 30 seconds, begin your retrieve by the standard lift and drop technique. I like a fairly high lift of at least two to three feet to allow the bait that much of a fall. However, don’t rush your retrieve. Let the bait rest a minimum of 10 seconds between lifts. If you follow this advice, I know you’ll get bit more often. I always start off by fishing the stick bait rigged weedless Texas rig style without any weight. Once the head of the bait gets torn up from catching one or more fish, I then simply rig it wacky style to be able to get another fish off the same bait. One of the nice things about rigging it wacky style is you can use baits that are a bit torn up and they still work just as well. If you encounter high wind conditions, add a bullet weight or rig Carolina style to prevent the wind from dragging your line and stick bait. Stick baits obviously work well in deeper water fishing but excel as a go to bait no matter how deep you’re fishing. I’ve had tremendous success with them fishing tight against the shoreline during the spawn when targeting fish in 1 to 3 feet of water as well as fishing as deep as 45 feet of water.
Line: I always use fluorocarbon when fishing stick baits. Fluorocarbon sinks which is what you want. You don’t absolutely have to use fluorocarbon but it works better than using monofilament when fishing stick baits. There are a number of manufacturers of fluorocarbon line so I encourage you to try different lines and select what you have confidence in. Match the lb test to the rod and reel you are using and the clarity of the water you’ll be fishing. On spinning reels I’ll use 8 to 10 lb test and on conventional bait casters, 10 to 12 lb test. You may want to use heavier line if fishing heavy cover.
Hooks: For the Rude Baits 5.25 stick baits, I like to use 2/0 and 3/0 EWG hooks. Gamakatsu and Eagle Claw both make quality EWG hooks. You can also use the standard offset worm hook. I like to “skin hook” the point. If you’re not familiar with the term “Skin hooking” a plastic stick bait or plastic worm, research online to see videos or pictures. If not skin hooking, embed the hook point into the bait to make it weed less. The only time I fish a stick bait with the hook exposed is when rigging wacky style.
If you haven’t tried Rude Baits BT Stik Baits, order some online at www.rudebaits.com and you’ll see the difference in your catch rate. You can go wrong fishing all eight of the colors but I generally like to fish the grape, junebug or pomegranate in the morning and switch to the watermelon, green pumpkin, Kiwi seed and pumpkin in the afternoon. If fishing is tough, try another color until you find what they want. The black with blue flake can be the ticket sometimes when the bass don’t seem to want the standard colors. If fishing at night, definitely try the black with blue flake. I suggest purchasing all 8 and fishing them all to determine your favorites. All of the Rude Baits Stik Baits are injected with heavy salt and scent. Order some today; you’ll be glad you did! Please contact us if you have any questions regarding our baits, this article or any fishing related questions. You can contact me through the website at: www.rudebaits.com.
Thanks and good fishing! (Please practice catch and release.)
Mike Rude,

August 9, 2013   Comments Off on Stick Bait Techniques and Tackle

Swim Bait Techniques for Calico Bass

May through August is prime time for Calico bass fishing here in southern California and there’s no better way to catch large numbers of Calico bass than throwing swim baits. In addition, you’ll normally catch the larger fish throwing swim baits versus fishing live or cut bait.
Swim baits and jig heads: When it comes to what jig head to use, it is really up to the angler to use whatever brand jig heads they prefer. As far as size and weight, you want to use a jig head that allows for maximum cast ability according to the rod, reel and line you’re using. As a general rule, jig heads in the 1/2 oz. to 1.5 oz. range will be needed for the 4” and 5” Rude Baits swim baits. Try different sizes until you find the best size for your particular rod and reel and fishing situation.
I know many anglers who are firm believers that the jig head should be painted, and/or have eyes, which I do believe helps, but I’ve caught as many bass on unpainted jig heads as I have on painted heads. I really believe the bass key in on the swim bait itself and the action of the bait, more so than the overall appearance of the bait and jig head.
Weedless jig head on not? Skirted or not? We’ve had great success using both skirted jig heads and non-skirted as well. Some anglers only use skirted jig heads as they believe the skirt adds to the action and entices more strikes. I personally prefer to use non-skirted jig heads without a weed guard if I’m able to find fish by casting between, or next to kelp stringers. If you are throwing into open pockets in the kelp beds, or targeting deeper water in kelp beds, then you obviously want to use a jig head with a weed guard. It also helps to use jig heads that have the eye at the top front of the nose of the jig head, preferably with a rounded underside that helps you lift the bait over the kelp stringers without getting hung up. When fishing more open water, it really doesn’t matter what style of jig head you use. In open water, I sometimes use the standard “shad” style jig head.
Rods and reels: Most serious Calico bass anglers use 7-6” to 8 ft swim bait casting rods with a properly matched reel. A reasonably priced example would be a 7’ 11” Shimano Crucial swim bait casting rod that retails around $180 matched with a Shimano Curado 200G reel (retail around $160) or 300E (retail around $250). You of course, can spend much more on rods and reels than the example given. However, any good quality light saltwater combo or heavy freshwater combo that allows you to cast swim baits on a jig head a good distance and has a good quality drag system on the reel will work. Calico bass range from a couple of pounds to the occasional double digit hog so the real benefit to having quality tackle is being able to land a much larger fish like a white seabass or yellowtail should you get bit by another species of fish while Calico fishing. For those who prefer spinning tackle, select a quality rod 7’ to 7’6” medium heavy action and fast tip and match with a quality spinning reel.
Line: Always use quality line of the recommended test suited for the reel you’re using. If you’re fishing primarily open water, use good quality monofilament line 12 to 20 lb test. When I’m throwing swim baits between the kelp stringers, over kelp stringers into pockets, or letting my swim bait sink down into areas where I know there is kelp or bottom structure, I use Power Pro Spectra 50 lb test with a short 20 lb Seaguar fluorocarbon leader of 18” to 24”. I usually join the two lines with a uni to uni knot connection. The Spectra will cut through the kelp stringers if you get hung up or have a big fish on. A lot of anglers are now using straight Spectra.
Techniques for throwing swim baits: When it comes to Calico bass, you need to fish where there’s kelp or rocky structure. Whether fishing from your own boat, or fishing from an open party or charter boat, cast your swim bait between open cuts in the kelp let it sink but not all the way to the bottom. If not bit on the sink, then start your retrieve before your swim bait hits the bottom. If you’re using Rude Baits swim baits, a slow to medium, steady retrieve is best. If there are no open cuts you can cast to, cast to the very edges of the kelp beds and use the same technique of letting it sink, then starting a slow to medium, steady retrieve. Calico bass like to hide in the kelp stringers and attack bait fish swimming by. Another technique is to look for open pockets of water in the kelp bed and cast into the pockets, much like freshwater bass fishing grass mat areas where you flip a jig into open pockets but with Calico fishing, you are casting the swim bait into the open pocket, letting it sink and then slowly retrieving the bait until it hits the edge of the kelp where you either let it sink back down to hopefully get bit, or gliding it back over the kelp so you don’t get hung up. Use Spectra with a fluorocarbon leader or straight Spectra as noted above when doing this type of fishing. Use jig heads with weed guards as well.
Swim bait size and color: I’m a firm believer that bigger baits catch bigger fish. However, that is of course a generality and any angler that fishes much can cite numerous examples of big fish they’ve caught on small baits. I recommend the 4” and 5” Rude Baits swim baits when fishing Calicos. I’ll typically fish the 5” and only switch to the 4” if the Calicos are running small in size. When it comes to color, we’ve had tremendous success on all of the colors we offer. As I say with any soft plastic bait, fish the color you have confidence in.
When it comes to swim baits, there are many manufacturers to choose from. We at Rude Baits of course believe our swim baits are the best. All of our baits are injected laminates so you’ll never have the bait split at the color transition point because both colors are injected together. Most other swim bait manufacturers use open pour techniques that allow cooling of one color before the second color is poured on top. This doesn’t always allow the two colors to fuse solidly together, thereby sometimes having the bait split, particularly when you insert the jig head hook into the bait. You’ll never have that problem with Rude Baits! Rude Baits swim baits also have extremely vivid colors and are made with a softer plastic than any other swim bait manufacturer. Rude Baits swim baits are designed to be fished slower than other swim baits. This allows the bait to remain in the fish “zone” longer, thereby increasing the number of strikes! Order some today online at www.rudebaits.com and you’ll see the incredible action they have retrieved at slower speeds.

August 9, 2013   Comments Off on Swim Bait Techniques for Calico Bass

Drop Shot Techniques and Tackle

The drop shot technique is one of the most effective methods of catching largemouth and smallmouth bass from deeper water. Here in California, most of the lakes are deepwater man made reservoirs. Fishing shallow usually lasts just a few months covering the pre-spawn, spawn and post spawn period. Outside of that period of time, bass are usually found in deeper water. I’ve fished and caught largemouth as deep as 45 feet of water at Diamond Valley lake (near Hemet, CA). That is a rather extreme example. Most bass fishing outside of the pre/post spawn window is in 8 to 35 feet of water. This is where the drop shot technique can be deadly.
Drop shot tackle:
Line: The number one tip in using the drop shot effectively is to choose the right line. I always use fluorocarbon and after trying different brands, my favorite is Sunline Super FC Sniper Fluorocarbon. It is expensive but I personally don’t mind paying the high cost as I’ve found it translates to getting bit more often and breaking less than other brands. I also like the fact it comes in odd and even pound strengths, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10 and 12 lb. I personally like to use the 5 lb when drop shotting clear water lakes. If you are fishing darker color water, you can get away with 6 or 7 lb test. I would only use the 8, 10 and 12 if you are specifically targeting bigger fish. There are a number of other manufacturers of fluorocarbon line so I encourage you to try different lines and select what you have confidence in.
Hooks: Select the appropriate type and size hook according to what you are drop shotting. Many baits can be effectively fished on the drop shot: plastic worms; creature baits; grubs, even lizards. I always fish Rude Baits BT worms on the drop shot as we’ve specifically designed these worms to suspend horizontally, thereby giving the worm a more natural appearance and this translates into getting bit more often. If I’m fishing the 4.5” worm, I like to use a size 4 Gamakatsu black hook. If fishing the 6” worm, I like a size 2 hook for drop shotting. Nose hook the worm by inserting the hook from bottom through the top with the hook exposed. You can also rig it weedless if you are fishing submerged trees and brush. Thread the hook through the end of the nose as if you were Texas rigging. Turn the hook downward through the underside and turn around and embed the hook point back up into the bait. You will miss some bites rigging weedless so I only recommend it if the fish are concentrated in submerged trees or brush.
Rods and Reels: Drop shotting is best done using spinning tackle for a variety of reasons, the number one reason being it is a technique that requires light line, small hooks, and the need to get a good hook set using light line and small hooks. Selecting the right fishing rod is more critical that the reel. I definitely recommend you get a rod specifically designed for drop shotting. This means purchasing a 6’ 10” to 7’ 2”spinning rod that is extremely light weight with a sensitive and responsive tip that will enable you to bury a hook without a hard sweep set. A simple snap of the wrist should enable you to set the hook. Medium to medium light action with an extra fast tip is best. G. Loomis makes a great drop shot rod, as does Shimano and Diawa. Match the correct spinning reel to the rod you are purchasing. All rod manufacturers, as well as your local tackle store, can recommend the right reel for your rod choice. A quality drop shot rod will generally cost you close to $200 on up. A corresponding quality spinning reel will be $100 and up. I recommend you purchase as good a quality spinning reel as you can afford as the drag system is critical when drop shotting since you will be using light line. I could recommend a number of reels from various manufacturers but it really is personal preference when it comes to reels so I suggest you stick with the manufacturer you’re comfortable with.
Tip to save money: If you’re looking to save some money, I’d recommend St. Croix Mojo bass spinning rod, model MBS69MLXF. It is 6’ 9” with a medium light action and extra fast tip. This rod retails for around $100. Pflueger makes some nice quality spinning reels starting at $99. You can put these two together to get a drop shot outfit for less than $200.
Setup: If you don’t know how to tie a Palomar knot, you need to learn. There are numerous videos online on how to tie this simple knot. Practice it until you are able to get the hook to stand out horizontally from your line with the hook point up and your drop shot weight 12” to 18” below. I like to use drop shot weights but you can use bell weights or larger split shot if you’re trying to save money. Drop shot weights range from 1/8 oz to ½ oz. I usually just buy ¼ oz and 3/8 oz. Expect to lose tackle as this technique is prone to snags since you are fishing with an exposed hook.
Locating fish and drop shot fishing techniques: Since drop shotting is primarily a deep water technique, it doesn’t work well fished from shore (too prone to getting snagged). Drop shotting is a technique primarily used when fishing from a boat. It is obviously best when you have the ability to locate the fish with your fish finder sonar. If the fish are stacked up or concentrated near the bottom, fish the drop shot vertically by dropping the rig all the way to the bottom. The bite can range anywhere from the line suddenly feeling heavy to a noticeable tick, to the feel of a flat out hard strike. It is important to remember to not do a hard sweep set. If the fish has hit hard or already “loaded’ the rod, you don’t need any hard set of the hook. If the bite is of the “tap, tap” variety, do a quick snap of the wrist. This should set the hook. As far as imparting action to the bait when vertically drop shotting, it depends on what bait you’re fishing. Almost all plastic baits either sink or float. Depending on the particular bait, hang it over the side in the water and see what it does. Either the tail end will float up, or sink down. “Work” the bait so you can see what action you want to impart when it is on the bottom. When drop shotting, less action is frequently better. That is why we at Rude Baits developed a worm that stays suspended horizontally. This allows you to fish the bait without having to impart a lot of action to keep the bait horizontal like you do when the bait either sinks or floats. Simply give the occasional slight shake of the rod tip. Try Rude Baits BT worms and you’ll be surprised at how many more fish you catch on these baits versus any other bait when drop shotting.
Casting and retrieving a drop shot rig: Rigging the drop shot as noted above and then casting and bouncing the rig on the bottom back to boat not only allows you to cover more water, thereby inducing more strikes, but it can flat out be the best method in finding fish and getting them to strike when all other techniques have failed. Expect more hang ups but also expect far more bites.
Drop shotting has been an incredibly effective method for catching bass for both the tournament angler and weekend angler for years on the west coast. It has gained in popularity all over the country the last couple of years, especially where there are large populations of smallmouth bass. If you like smallmouth bass fishing and haven’t mastered drop shotting, you definitely need to. Whether it’s for the purpose of winning tournaments or simply having a great day on the water, try it and master it, you’ll be glad you did.
If you haven’t tried Rude Baits BT worms for drop shotting, order some online and you’ll see the difference in your catch rate. I like fishing the Dark Dusk, First Light, Magic Melon and Kiwi Krush in the morning and PB & J, Money Honey, Green Tree and Lemon Lime in the afternoons but I suggest purchasing all 8 and fishing them all to determine your favorites. All of the Rude Baits BT worms are injected laminates with incredibly vivid colors that cannot be fully appreciated by looking at website pictures. You have to see these baits in person to see the incredible colors of the baits. Order some today; you’ll be glad you did! Please contact us if you have any questions regarding our baits, this article or any fishing related questions. You can contact me through the website at: www.rudebaits.com.
Thanks and good fishing! (Please practice catch and release.)
Mike Rude,
Rude Baits, where “The Formula is the Difference”

May 29, 2013   Comments Off on Drop Shot Techniques and Tackle

Texas Rigging soft plastic baits

Texas Rigging soft plastic baits

Texas rigging refers to using a sliding sinker and inserting the hook into the bait so the point of the hook is not exposed. This allows to you to fish the bait in heavy cover, weeds, submerged trees, etc. without getting it snagged. Texas rigging has been used for more than fifty years and the originator of this rigging technique is unknown but due to the name itself, it is presumed to have originated in Texas. I learned how to fish for largemouth bass using this technique and it is perhaps the most “tried and true” method in catching bass on soft plastic baits.

There are numerous pictures, text and videos on the web illustrating how to Texas rig a bait.

There are also variations of the Texas rig. Wiki How has a good illustration of a slight variation of the traditional Texas rig showing the subtle difference of “skin hooking” the bait versus simply embedding the hook in the bait as shown in the traditional method above.  http://www.wikihow.com/Texas-Rig-a-Plastic-Worm

You can view numerous other examples by simply entering “Texas rigging a worm” into a GOOGLE search.

The number one aspect to Texas rigging correctly is to make sure the bait remains straight after rigging. If the bait is curved after rigging, it will spin when being retrieved. This will not only cause line twist, but will result in less success in getting bit. If you wind up with a curve, pull the point out of the bait and re-insert so the bait is straight. A trick to ensuring this is after the first two steps shown above simply lay the hook against the side of the bait and visually line up where the hook will need to be inserted into the bait. You can mark this spot with the hook point if needed.

What sinker/weight to use: Most fishermen use a “bullet” weight type sliding sinker when Texas rigging although an egg sliding sinker will also work. The bullet sinkers work best as they slide through weeds easier than the egg sinker. As far as what weight sinker to use, you should always use the lightest possible sinker/weight depending on wind conditions. No wind, use the smallest sliding sinker needed to get the bait to the bottom. As wind increases, you will need to increase the weight to account for line drag.

As noted in my blog post on fishing soft plastic baits, it is critical to fish soft plastic baits as slow as possible. The number one mistake fisherman make in fishing soft plastics is fishing them too fast.

The best thing about Texas rigging is the ability to fish heavy cover because that is where the fish frequently are. Another variation to Texas rigging is “pegging” the sinker so it doesn’t slide. “Pegging” refers to inserting a toothpick or something else into the sliding sinker. The purpose of this is to prevent the slider sinker from moving. You’ll want to do this when fishing specific types of cover like Tules or submerged tree limbs. If you don’t “peg” the bait, as you move the Texas rigged bait over a submerged tree limb or Tule, the weight and worm will sometimes wind up on opposites sides of the limb or Tule. This increases your chances of getting snagged despite the bait being rigged weed less. They make fixed bullet weight hook combinations but they are of course, more expensive than buying hooks and weights separately.  You can also switch to using a fixed weight like a split shot but then you are not getting the benefit of the increased weed less capabilities by using a pointed bullet weight.

The best technique for retrieving Texas rigged plastics is the traditional “lift and drop” technique. Another technique that is very effective, particularly when fishing larger plastic worms (7’ and larger) is “stitching”.  There are multiple videos and discussions of “stitching” on the web. The “stitching” technique is most effective when the bottom structure is relatively flat such as sand or gravel bottoms without much structure.  By “stitching” the line, you keep the plastic bait crawling along the bottom, thereby mimicking a more natural movement versus the “lift and drop”.

The option of fishing soft plastics bait rigged weed less as illustrated above without a sliding sinker or any kind of weight is also sometimes referred as a weightless Texas rig. This is traditionally how a Stick bait (Senko) is rigged. Any sinking soft plastic bait can be fished weed less style without a weight. You’ll need to determine if the particular bait you’re using is a sinking or floating soft plastic bait.

I use many techniques when fishing for bass but I probably spend more than 50% of my time fishing for largemouth bass using one variation or another of the Texas rig. If you see me on the water, I’ll always have at least one rod rigged with a Texas rigged Rude Baits plastic worm. Wishing you the best of luck on the water as always!

February 27, 2013   Comments Off on Texas Rigging soft plastic baits

Welcome to Rude Baits blog where you’ll find fishing tips and more!

How to fish soft plastic baits

The number one tip in fishing soft plastic baits is to fish them slow!

The slower you fish them, the more success you’re going to have. It doesn’t matter if the bait is Texas rigged, Carolina rigged, weightless, drop shot, or any other method of rigging, always remember that the slower you fish them the more success you’ll have. The only exception to this is fishing plastic swim baits. When fishing swim baits, you’ll want to vary the retrieval speed according to conditions and specific situations. If bass are chasing shad or other baitfish, you need to use a retrieval speed that will entice a strike. That is usually a faster speed than when the fish are not in an active feeding mode. Swim baits are also very effectively fished at slower speeds, sometimes referred as to “slow rolling” the bait. Cast the swim bait to the area holding fish and if the fish are on the bottom, or suspended just off the bottom, you’ll want to let the swim bait sink all of the way to the bottom, then start your retrieve and retrieve slow enough to keep the swim bait in the zone holding fish. If the fish are suspended at a specific depth or near the surface, use the countdown method to get the swim bait to the zone before retrieving.

When fishing all other plastics other than swim baits, bass in particular will frequently strike when the bait is at rest, on the fall, or immediately after you’ve moved the bait. The most common method for retrieving plastics is to cast to the area holding fish, let the bait sink all of the way to the bottom and let it rest before moving the bait. Watch for a sudden movement of any slack line on the sink, or if your line is tight, you’ll feel the “tick tick” as the fish inhales the bait. If your line is tight, set the hook immediately. If your line was slack and now has tightened from the pickup of the bait, set the hook as soon as your line has tightened. Remember to set the hook as hard as you can. If you haven’t gotten a strike on the fall or from letting it rest for at least 30 seconds, you can start your retrieve. The retrieve typically consists of a lifting of the rod tip and lowering to allow the bait to rise and fall. Watch for strikes on the fall and at rest as noted. Always let the bait rest for a minimum of 10 seconds between lifts. This method will result in taking a long time to retrieve a single cast but will translate into much more success than hurrying your retrieve.

Look for additional tips and various ways to rig Rude baits in future posts. Mike R.

October 11, 2012   Comments Off on Welcome to Rude Baits blog where you’ll find fishing tips and more!

SSL Certificate Authority